Steinweiss covers for Decca DL8000s, 1951-1953


Some sort of glitch between my browser and wordpress has resulted in a problem. the covers pictured in the previous post are not the last six covers 1967-1969, they are a bunch of covers from 1951 to 1953. Here are most of those same covers, plus one more in two color variants. The 10 covers in the previous post are the earliest 12 inch lp covers by Steinweiss for Decca that I have. the Armstrong record is dated 1951, and looks like Steinweiss. The rest are dated 1953, and may be reissues of ones that had earlier covers. Most if not all of these are clearly Steinweiss designs. Some are signed Piedra Blanca, Spanish ofr White Stone. Steinweiss is, of course, Yiddish for White Stone. Many of these are in the Music for Your Mood Series, and are a very nice bunch of designs. this post has most of the same ones, plus DL8009 – an earlier lp, but this cover is much later, after 1955. It is still Steinweiss. I also have added the last 1969 Steinweiss Decca DL4000 series cover, which if all goes well will be in the next post as well.

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2 Responses to Steinweiss covers for Decca DL8000s, 1951-1953

  1. Rockdoc999 says:

    Following Steinweiss’ career through his record sleeves is a fascinating journey. These covers are more reminiscent of Steinweiss’ Columbia covers from the 40s. I like them more than the Decca covers you have previously posted.

    • recordcovers says:

      Thanks for writing again. Yes, I agree with you. I did not realize until I started this blog that most of Steinweiss’ work in the 1960s (ending in 1972, according to what he told me once) was interesting for the times, but had nowhere near the power of his earlier work. I think the progression is straight down hill after 1948. slowly down hill, but still downwards. In other words, he got better from his first work in 1939-1940 for a few years, hit a peak that is unequaled by anybody in graphic design in 1946 to 1948, and after that never was that brilliant again. I don’t know if this is due to the demands of the times, or due to what happens to most artists in most fields – they do their best work early.

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